Part 2: Comparing Perceptive Content (ImageNow) and OnBase

Perceptive Content and OnBase by Hyland are both powerful and industry leading enterprise content management platforms. Though they share many similarities, there are some differences between terminology and features. In this webinar we help translate the main terms and features between these two platforms to help clients that are considering a migration.

Transcript

John Marney:
Hello, everyone, and think you for joining us again for an RPI Consultants Webinar Wednesdays. Today we’re discussing part two of a two-part series on comparing OnBase and Perceptive Content, and their terms and their features.

Before we get started real quick, of course, just a few notes for the attendees. This webinar will be recorded and available on our website and our YouTube channel. And of course the slide deck itself will be sent out to everybody, so don’t feel like you have to take any screenshots.

We have someone standing by to take questions from you. On part one of this webinar, we had a lot of questions, so we’re anticipating the same thing here.

Also, we wanna let you know that we welcome all feedback in terms of anything you would like to see presented, so please send us your ideas as far as any content you might wanna see presented in our webinar series. With that in mind, let’s get going.

James Cho:
Hi, my name’s James Cho. I’m a lead consultant at here at RPI Consultants. I have over eight years’ Perceptive Content experience, I’m a certified OnBase installer, and most of my experience is around manufacturing health care. And, I love my rescue pit bull, Coco.

John Marney:
And many of you would know me. I’m John Marney, our manager of solution delivery. Over eight years of experience in ECM and OCR design and implementation that’s across many different platforms. Majority of my background is in health care and, even more specifically, in financials or back office of health care.

If you have an accounts available solution in Perceptive Content, I probably assisted in the implementation. I enjoy my time outside with the grill, spending time playing board games on the weekends, and I am a proud alumni of Kansas State.

Real quick, here’s what we’re talking about today. We’ll give you a little bit of information about RPI Consultants for anyone who doesn’t know, and then we’ll jump right in to our content. Today, we’ll be discussing a few different aspects of the systems. First, their various OCR capabilities, the differences they have between forms or eForms, the server and database architecture, as well as a number of other features. Finally, we’ll wrap up with some questions.

So, a bit about RPI. James?

James Cho:
RPI has about 80 full-time consultants, project managers and technical architects. About 25 of us are in the imaging practice, and we have over 16 years of experience in ERP and ECM solutions. Our primary locations are in Baltimore, Tampa and Kansas City.

RPI provides services for all organizations that are either already using Perceptive or OnBase, and are looking for a new ECM platform. We design new solutions, custom development, upgrades, and training for everything else related to Perceptive and OnBase – even migrating from Perceptive to OnBase.

John Marney:
And those migration are a hot topic right now.

Okay, so comparing terms and features. Last time on Webinar Wednesdays, in our last month’s webinar, we discussed a few topics around the user experience, mostly, in Perceptive and OnBase. We discussed the various clients that users will log in to – both the client and thin client.

We discussed the various capture pieces, scanning or e-mail capture, the indexing and indexing structure of documents and how the difference between custom properties and keywords look, and then the similarities in the Document Viewer around how documents display and how to use annotations, and then finally, some of the functionality of Workflow with queues and routing.

Jumping in to today’s content, first we’ll discuss OCR options. Many Perceptive users will be familiar with Brainware or Perceptive Intelligent Capture, or, Perceptive Intelligent Capture, also formerly known as Brainware. We’re now back to Brainware. It is a stand-alone product, so not deeply integrated in to Perceptive Content. However, that is the go-to solution, or has been for a long time.

James Cho:
With the acquisition of Perceptive, Brainware will still be the go-to stand-alone platform for OCR integrating with OnBase. There is a more light-weight solution that’s comparable to Rec Agent that does barcodes, text readings, called Advanced Data Capture.

John Marney:
That Advanced Data Capture is really fully-integrated in OnBase, can do some quick zonal capture, barcode reading like James said. That is somewhat similar to Recognition Agent. Recognition Agent in Perceptive doesn’t have the same GUI setup; it all has to be scripted, but it can still do some — what we would call — light OCR.

As far as other clients, there are other third-party or other solutions available. Kofax reads off your invoices and then Kofax KTM or TotalAgility can always be set up to do OCR.

James Cho:
Yeah, and OnBase still has the integration capabilities to integrate with ReadSoft, Kofax, and they also have another product called AnyDoc.

John Marney:
Next topic are forms. In Perceptive, eForms are often used to collect data and drive business processes alongside your documents. They’re built in HTML/JavaScript. They’re custom developed; they’re basically building a webpage that goes inside your Document Viewer.

There’s been some functionality that was introduced a long time ago in Form Designer that allowed some level of drag-and-drop form building, but it was always half-baked and I’m not sure it’s even available anymore.

James Cho:
OnBase has some legacy eForms that are very similar to Perceptive, where you have to code in HTML/JavaScript and then you have to also do custom development to program that logic around the fields.

But now, they have something called Unity Forms, which is their new go-to form designer, where it’s no coding required. Pretty much what you see is what you get, drag-and-drop, and mapping all the data points is fairly simple. You could deploy a form within minutes.

John Marney:
Yeah, so one of the biggest differences is that, whereas in Perceptive your forms are very abstracted from the document themselves, your form fields are not tied to your keys and custom properties at all. So if you were to have your form filled out, you’d have to run it through a script to actually map that information onto your document.

James Cho:
In OnBase, the fields are actually the keywords, so you don’t have to have any ancillary scripts that map or re-index documents.

John Marney:
Big change, there, between the two systems.

Quick note on reporting. Not much to describe, here, but in Perceptive, the official reporting platform is a product called Business Insight — has been for a number of years, now. Business Insight runs on IBM Cognos, so while there’s a lot of out-of-the-box reporting available, most organizations typically find they really need to customize their reporting, which anybody familiar with IBM’s Cognos can do.

James Cho:
Yeah, and in OnBase, they have their own proprietary reporting dashboard solution, so it’s really easy to use. User-friendly, it’s all drag-and-dropped. There’s even a wizard inside where it’ll ask you what kind of data points you want to display, and you don’t need to be a developer to do it.

John Marney:
Another quick note on security. There’s a couple minor differences between Perceptive and OnBase. In Perceptive, if a user’s granted permission to, let’s say, view a document, that means that their ability to actually log in to the system is assumed. If you’re given that privilege, you’re actually given permission to log in to any client, whether it’s Experience, or WebNow, or Yoga, or the thin client.

James Cho:
In OnBase, you have to actually explicitly allow to log in to different types of clients and it’s either a deny or allow. There’s no soft deny.

John Marney:
Right, whereas in Perceptive, if you don’t assign a permission, it’s a soft deny. You can also allow something explicitly or give an explicit denial, whereas in OnBase, it’s just a “Yes” or “No.”

A bit on the server and the database architecture. This is gonna jump around a little bit, so I apologize. In Perceptive, the ImageNow or Perceptive server drags all traffic to the database, so your Perceptive client connects to the application server or the web server connects to the application server, and then there’s just one single path of information between the database and the server.

James Cho:
In OnBase, the architecture is a little more decentralized. OnBase Thick Client directly connects to the database via ODDC and disk groups by network share, but if you wanna use the Unity Client, it requires an application server, which can add multiple instances on o