Perceptive Content Tasks

Perceptive’s Workflow is a powerful tool, but can be too rigid for every application. This webinar hosted by Alex Lindsey will explore using Tasks for a more flexible ad-hoc workflow, and will discuss their benefits, best practices, and scalability.

Transcript

John Marney:
Hello and welcome to RPI Consultants day two, our summer webinar series. Today we’re gonna be talking about tasks and perceptive content. How, why and when to use them. My name is John Marney, and this is our main presenter, Alex Lindsey.

Alex Lindsey:
Morning.

John Marney:
First, a little bit about RPI for those of you who may not know about us. We’ve been working with the Perceptive content platform for around 16 years. We’ve also been working with the Kofax products for a long time as well, for a good chunk of that period. Within the last year, we have started our partnership with Hyland and have been getting familiar with those products. We recently brought on board a senior architect, Sydney Isle, to help with our training and getting us familiar with those products to deliver.

We have around 20 team members in our Perceptive or imaging practice. We’re based here in Kansas City. The remainder of the company, around 70 people, focus on the Infor Lawson products. We have our headquarters in Baltimore and we also have an office in Tampa.

Alex Lindsey:
In a lot of the work that we do, again, primarily around Perceptive, but we really get into that Kofax and Hyland space right now but eForm and iScript development, however big or small, if you have modifications to an existing or want just an extra iScript for any other function, we can do that. Workflow designs and redesigns, I do quite a bit of that myself, I really enjoy it. Upgrades and health checks if you want us to take a look under the hood of your solution. Security audits, migrations, and we also have a great clinical and HL7 staff.

For our Bios that we’ve included this time, again, my name is Alex Lindsey, I’m a senior solution architect, I’ve got over five years of experience with the Perceptive product suite. Pretty much seen everything at this point. Do complex solution designs, tons of integrations with different ERPs and other applications. I love to find efficiencies and I also love a dram of whiskey every now and then.

John Marney:
Of course, my name is John Marney, I’m our manager of solution delivery here on the imaging team. More years of image now in Kofax experience than I care to admit, I wall talk your ear off about our yoga products. Hopefully you joined us yesterday for our webinar on yoga SMS, and do not even joke with me about Game Of Throne Spoilers, I’m dead serious.

Alex Lindsey:
Everyone dies. Let’s get into it ’cause we have a lot of content to cover here. What are tasks? Essentially, they are an action based workflow item. A task can be assigned to a specific user tied to a specific document asking them to perform some kind of action. These re great for exception handling, things like that. There are no extra licenses and one of the big benefits of tasks for doing user actions and things like that is that you can customize the language to be specific to what you’re doing.

John Marney:
It’s important to keep in mind that this is different and separate than the typical Perceptive Content workflow. Tasks have an Ad-hoc nature meant to be used on demand to have a dynamic workflow that can built on the fly, dynamically, based on the business need.

Alex Lindsey:
Yeah.

John Marney:
You don’t have the rigid structure of the cue by cue system that your typical workflow has.

Alex Lindsey:
Yeah, and some other benefits too, if you do a lot of things in workflow with a lot of cues and a lot of approvers for instance, where a specific approver has to have a specific cue or sub cue within a super cue. Tasks can kind of alleviate a lot of those admin responsibilities because you don’t have to have that structure strictly in an organization that may have a lot of turnover, tasks may make more sense for you.

We’re just gonna jump right into how to make a task real quick. From your management console, you can see here, you should have tasks. Again, not a separately licensed item, so you should have access to this. And you can basically create a different type of task, so we’ve got document efficiency and pointer type tasks. There’s really not a lot of difference between the two. John will mention a little bit about the pointer when it comes to visual representations later but basically, document efficiency should handle most of your needs, especially if you’re an accounts payable solution at the moment.

John Marney:
And here in the second tab, you have reason lists. These are customizable lists that individual task types or task templates can leverage. If a task is returned or whether it’s approved, you can have the person that is assigned the task select a reason, so for example, when an account’s payable, an approver may want to return an approval task because the GL coding is incorrect or the amount was distributed improperly. So we can create custom lists here in this tab to have custom language around what what our reasons are.

Alex Lindsey:
And if you are gonna set up specific language for thee reasons, I’d suggest you do that before you set up the task because it will prompt you later on during the task set up to select the specific reasons.

So the first part, let’s just name it, let’s name the task and give us short description. Kind of in line with our example for later, we’re going to have a request to review, so this is an invoice approval. This is a request of a purchase order invoice needs to review this document itself for specific things. Always make sure the “Is active” is checked and we also have a delete completed task checkbox. I recommend you do not use that. The whole purpose of task is to create an audit trail and a history so you can see where things have been and who’s done what with the document or invoice itself.

By checking that, you would essentially, just delete all the work that you’ve done and there’s no real audit history after that point.

John Marney:
Then on the components tab, the first thing we want to do is provide task instructions. This is what the user will see when they first open the task, and our instructions on what they’re supposed to be doing with that document. This is fully customizable and even that first checkbox allows the person who assigns the task to modify those instructions as well.

The second set of check boxes there under task location, the first two are pretty self explanatory. You’ve got folder and document, so if you want this task to be able to be assigned to either or both of those, you can check them. The third and forth option are a little less clear. You’ve got page without a visual representation and page with a visual representation. Now, both of these will allow you to assign a task to an individual page. So if you needed, for example, in the contacts management workflow, if you needed to have multiple people looking at different pages of a document, there would be a used case for that.

But the page without a visual representation means that there’s actually no page there, and what that is used in is forms that are submitted via form server, where the form is actually the first page of the document, but there’s actually no page image. It is page without a visual representation. But in general, unless you really have a reason to restrict them, you can just select them all.

For completion method, we typically don’t allow tasks to be automatically completed. We usually want a user to review those, so we would leave that at manual.

And then finally, at the bottom, you have the workflow assignment. This what will happen to the document or folder when the task is assigned. Tasks themselves do not go to a workflow cue.

Alex Lindsey:
The next part is your actions list, so this is where the meat of all automation happens within task based approval. So if you have an accounts payable solution with an eForm, you more than likely have some kind of either workflow or task based approval. So for the task based approvals, you’ve basically got actions here to specify certain things you can do based on the state of the task itself. So assigned, you can have an iScript send out a notification once it’s been assigned or route the document somewhere specifically.

Return: so if it’s returned, if it needs to got to a rejected cue or something like that, pending review, complete, complete you could have it, again send a notification or route it, or even do a database, right to a database with a flag of some sort marking it within loss center or some other ERP that this invoice has been approved. Canceled and invalid.

You also have send email notifications when task is created. That’s probably more for an Ad-hoc approach where you want just to have them do it with typical invoice approvals and things like that. We like to have iScripts just in those notifications.

John Marney:
And these are the reason lists that we had talked about a little bit earlier. You have basically an approved reason and a return reason list, and you’ll see populated in these boxes the options for each of those lists, and of course, you can designate whether the person who’s assigned the task must specify a reason or whether it’s optional.

Alex Lindsey:
We also have due date here, so this is important too if you’re doing more of an Ad-hoc approach. You can do it based on start date, so when did the test start? You can also do assignment date. So if you set up multiple levels of people to assign to, you can have basically the timer here go off or basically have the test return to them after a certain number of days. You can also just say no. No due date but we don’t necessarily recommend that.

John Marney:
So yeah. Specify the number of days and then you should be good to go with security. And so finally on the security tab you are specifying what users and groups can do specific actions on this task template. The main ones that you’re gonna have to manage are the create, who can actually create the tasks, who can review and view the tasks, and then also you have your manage and delete. We typically reserve those for actual managers in terms of administrators for the system, and then manage return tasks allows you to manage any tasks returned to you.

Alex Lindsey: 
Yep. After you’ve filled out most of this information, you can just click “okay” and that will create the task, so you’re basically ready to go from there