Watch the Webinar: HR Forms Library for Infor GHR with Yoga Forms™

Human Resources forms are stubborn things. You can be live on Infor GHR, or any other ERP HCM module, but probably still sending and receiving important employee information using physical and handwritten forms. Physical forms present a risk to any Human Resources department and your GHR solution because they can produce incomplete or inaccurate information, create delays in hiring and compensation, or they can just get lost – never to be found again.

Yoga is RPI’s proprietary software platform that exists to bridge the gap between your business processes and ERP, in this case the gap between collecting important employee information and getting it into Infor. Using Yoga Forms, RPI Consultants is now offering an out-of-the-box Human Resources Forms Library that includes the most commonly used and required forms in HR. The benefit of using Yoga Forms and our HR Forms Library is rapid deployment and discrete data integration with your GHR solution.

In this webinar, Melissa Olson, Practice Director of RPI’s Human Capital Management team, and John Marney, Practice Manager of RPI’s Content & Process Automation team, offer a deep dive into Yoga Forms and our new out-of-the-box HR Forms Library.

Transcript

Melissa Olson:

Okay. I guess we lost John, but in…

John Marney:

I’m on the phone.

Melissa Olson:

Okay, so I’ll just get us started. Hey.

John Marney:

Cool, thanks.

Melissa Olson:

Six minutes late, and I just moved over the weekend, didn’t realize what my camera would capture, so I don’t always live in disarray; you can tell by the way this is going today. But we’re doing a presentation today. We’re Yoga Forms, which you’ll learn a little bit about if you’ve never heard of the term or the product, and how it can help just automate your HR forms or any kind of forms that are related to your employee process. So, it could be IT forms. We’ll kind of get into some examples. With that, my name is Melissa Olson. I’m the HCM practice director at RPI Consultants. I’ve been with RPI about eight years. Before that I had a long and storied career in the Lawson space as a programmer, and then as an HRIS manager, so I’ve sat in both sides. I live in Dallas. As you see, I just moved. So, hopefully the next webinar will look a little bit nicer in the back. John?

John Marney:

Thank you, and thanks, everyone, for pausing your obsessive election coverage to join us. I have been with RPI for six, almost seven years, I think, and I have around 10 years, or over 10 year’s experience with process automation tools, and so I head up our process automation practice here at RPI Consultants. We specialize in all sorts of back office automation, including… Hey, now I’m in the webinar. Almost there. Including accounts payable automation and human resources. There we go, okay. I also have been spending the last couple years getting up to speed on Azure Cloud Architecture as part of our Yoga software deployment, and I am our Yoga product and dev ops manager.

John Marney:

So, really excited to discuss our Yoga forms offering for human resources with you today, and we’ll get this going. So, we’re going to cover some of the challenges that exist within human resources, and that’s both whether you already have a digital solution, or if you’re really coming from nothing, a paper process, then we’ll discuss what our proposal is to help solve these challenges. We will provide a demonstration. If the video doesn’t play because of my computer issues, we will have it available as part of the recording and send it out to attendees afterwards. And then we’re going to discuss how you can get started with using Yoga Forms in your environment. Okay, so…

Melissa Olson:

Yeah, so we talk about data collection and forms and paper, and no matter what industry you’re in, you’re going to have paper processes. You’re going to have web forms that might not be connected to your four databases that you have to kind of translate over. You’re going to have data that is not necessarily HR… You have a place for it in HR that you need to capture somehow. So, it’s pretty critical that you get data for your employees, you get timekeeping data, IT information. There’s a lot of things that go around, having an employee in your system that you need to grab, and all these requirements are system agnostic. An HR department is an HR department. We have different processes, but they’re nuanced, but pretty much everybody does new hires. They do transfers, terminations, regulatory reporting, so these forms aren’t necessarily specific to any one industry, and you’ll find the examples that we’ll talk about today you’re most likely encountering in your organization today.

John Marney:

And these gaps are everywhere, like Melissa said. The requirements to collect this data exist no matter what systems you may or may not have implemented, and so whether you’re coming from a paper-based solution today, or you have some basic information system or electronic data collection that exists, or even, really, if you would consider yourself digitally transformed and have fully-implemented automated processes and solutions, the gaps will continue to exist. There’s some reasons why the systems you have in place may elect to never try to cover them. So, the forms, then, are a natural outcome of the requirements for data collection, and these forms exist because you have requirements, and some of these requirements are now, and some of these requirements are for later. Right now you have some requirements for things that you have to send the federal or state governments, so you have to compose documents like a W-4, et cetera. You have the requirement to be auditable for your forms, and signatures. Did this person complete this document when they say they did, and did are we keeping it?

Melissa Olson:

Yeah, no I just wanted to jump in there-

John Marney:

Did you lose me?

Melissa Olson:

… because for many years-

John Marney:

Okay, yeah, go ahead.

Melissa Olson:

… yeah, no, I was going to say, for many years a lot of organizations or the government required signatures on forms. But there’s been a big shift to e-signatures, so there shouldn’t be any excuses anymore to move those auditable signatures and forms over to an electronic process or tool.

John Marney:

My computer’s completely locked up.

Melissa Olson:

Oh no.

John Marney:

Yeah, and you also have the requirements for security and to be ready for disaster recovery, and then you have the things that we can’t anticipate, things that happen, so COVID is a great example of some things that have rapidly introduced new challenges and requirements for our organization. The great example that we’re constantly being asked about is the payroll tax deferment where organizations say, “Well, maybe we want to provide the option for our employees to elect to do this, but how?” How are we going to do that, and it’s probably a pretty temporary thing anyway, so we can’t realistically expect our ERP provider to push out some rapid change to facilitate that. So, you have these ongoing challenges that you need a flexible solution to be able to cover. And then you have data that just doesn’t sit within the systems that you have today, and Melissa has a really great example of a solution she implemented in a previous slide around employee wellness plan.

Melissa Olson:

Yeah, so Infor doesn’t necessarily have something to track wellness. They have the benefits module, there’s an occupational health module, but if your organization offers wellness discounts based on different things that are being done throughout the year, going and getting preventative screenings, getting a certain amount of steps a day. There needs to be somewhere to track it. At my old company I was able just to build in Lawson, just through Lawson just a wellness program module with [inaudible 00:08:31] case tools to start capturing all of that data. So, we still needed a way to say, “Hey, employee, can you enter these things? Because I can track them in the database.” Employee self-service doesn’t have a screen for them to say, “Yes, I did my preventative screening, yes, I did,” and check all the boxes that would get them their credits at the end of the year, so that was one of the gaps, and we still had paper there.

Melissa Olson:

So, here we’re able to create those forms that your employees can log all of the activities they’re doing for their wellness plans, their wellness programs, and then the form can translate into either database, S3, GHR. We’ll be talking mostly about CloudSuite Version 11 today, but it can definitely be translatable back to the Version 10, and you start capturing some of those fields that do not exist in your current system. Just one example, but there are, I’m sure, many examples out there of things that you guys track that you’re having a hard time either using spreadsheets, access databases, or, well, third party [inaudible 00:09:39] software to track this. The idea is you really want to get all of your HR data, your employee data into your system of record, which is your HRIS system, CloudSuite, HCM. Okay.

John Marney:

Yep, and you have challenges any time you go to implement something, a new process like that. How do I get the data? What do I do with it once I have it, and that includes both the processing or workflow, and then, ultimately, where does it get stored, and what effects does that have, should it trigger additional processes, et cetera. So, why, then, do forms suck? What is it about these that we still continue to have problems with, even though they are ultimately ubiquitous? If nothing else, you have the human element, manual data entry that’s both the person filling out a paper form and the person reading the form. Bad handwriting is… Well, I know I certainly make other people fill out paper forms when it comes to handwriting, because my handwriting is basically illegible, and then it’s impossible to validate it.

John Marney:

Even a person who has great handwriting can write down an incorrect date or an incorrect Social Security number. I know I have filled out forms before and accidentally put the wrong information, things even like my own birthday, which y