The Business Case for v11 CloudSuite

CloudSuite v11 represents a major leap forward in technology and functionality that offers a very significant opportunity to address real pain points across all business areas in pretty much any organization. Join Richard Leigh Stout, a Partner at RPI and Chief Technologist, and Keith Wayland, RPI’s Managing Partner, for this webinar to review how v11’s powerful functionality – including flexible GL and HR Organizational structures, a single source for all Invoices and a modern Open Enrollment experience – can help your organization save time and money.

Transcript

Jackie:

Today we have for you Making the Case for v11, and with that I give you Mr. Keith Wayland and Mr. Richard Stout. Thank you.

Richard Stout:

Thank you.

Keith Wayland:

Thank you Jackie, really appreciate it and thank you to all of you that are taking a little bit of time to attend this webinar on Making the Case for v11.

Keith Wayland:

I remember towards the tail end of the version 10 cycle where we were approached with, “You know, somebody just needs to make the business case for going to version 10.” But ultimately version 10 was mostly … It was a technical project, right?

Richard Stout:

For sure.

Keith Wayland:

It was an infrastructure project.

Richard Stout:

Yeah.

Keith Wayland:

And the main reason to do that was to stay current and stay supported, and on the latest iterations, and take advantage of some of the smaller feature functionality-

Richard Stout:

And one of the main objectives of that project was to minimize end user disruption.

Keith Wayland:

Minimize end user disruption. For version 11 I think there will be more end user disruption. The good news is there’s a lot to gain out of going to version 11, right?

Richard Stout:

Yeah. Version 11 is a business disruptor.

Keith Wayland:

It is a business disruptor and a business improver, right? And what we want to talk about here today is how to go about making that business case in the way that makes sense for your organization. There are some things that are going to be pretty universal advantages to everyone, but there are certain items that are going to be more valuable to certain organizations than others. And how to go about identifying and quantifying what those opportunities are, so you can let that drive what your roadmap is for getting to version 11 and your investment looks like.

Richard Stout:

Yeah. Earlier today we emphasized that Lawson customers should have a plan for how they’re going to move their organization forward. And you can consider this webinar a tool in that toolbox, of helping our clients be prepared to talk about what their plans are for the future.

Keith Wayland:

But first Bill Geddy forces us to put something about RPI, which is not so bad. So in a nutshell RPI is a group of consultants that really like to do cool projects, we work very hard for our customers. We’re certainly not perfect but we try to build long-term relationships and deliver as much value as we can, right? That it in a nutshell?

Richard Stout:

In a nutshell. I mean, we’re closing in on our 20th anniversary-

Keith Wayland:

We are. Yes we are. Next year. It’ll be next-

Richard Stout:

Next year.

Keith Wayland:

… October, yeah.

Richard Stout:

It will be exciting.

Keith Wayland:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Richard Stout:

I have been here through most of that and I’ve seen RPI grow. To me what’s been really exciting is our growth has been organic and has been driven by-

Keith Wayland:

Finding good people.

Richard Stout:

… finding the right people, right?

Keith Wayland:

Yep.

Richard Stout:

So hiring really smart people who are really passionate about what they do, listening to them, and building that intellectual capital. And we’re really excited to have the opportunity to put that intellectual capital to use for our clients today.

Keith Wayland:

Absolutely. So when we look at today’s agenda we’re going to frame the business problem and then we’re going to dive pretty deep into the business opportunity, and what that looks like, and what to search for your organization. We’re going to talk a little bit about risks and a calculated return on investment. And then we’re going to recommend an approach to get started.

Richard Stout:

Right.

Keith Wayland:

So, I mean, the first thing is … When we’re framing the problem is, is there a problem? I mean, you have a working system today and, presumably, vendors are getting paid, and purchase orders are going out, and people are getting hired, and HR personnel actions are occurring. So it’s not that you have a broken system, it’s that there are new, more evolved, systems. And by not having a best-of-class system you may have a lot of manual processes today, that lack visibility and transparency, that you can automate to repurpose some of your organizational resources.

Richard Stout:

So the problem comes down to not absolutely maximizing the potential of the systems and technology that could be in place. Even if you’re running a very stable, well-tuned Lawson 10 system, hey the goalposts have changed, right?

Keith Wayland:

Absolutely.

Richard Stout:

If you take a look at what’s out there in the market you need to be on a system that compares favorably to everything that’s out there and would be available for a new implementation.

Keith Wayland:

And that market, your competitors, they are changing. So right now that may not be as large, because a lot of your competitors may be in similar type systems, but next year and the year after, and within five years, that’s going to continue to expand, right? So really the business problem is not having a best-of-class system, as CloudSuite version 11 can offer.

Keith Wayland:

Two major areas that we’re just going to take a quick dive into is why are there these process inefficiencies? The first thing is older ERPs were more transaction driven solutions, right?

Richard Stout:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Keith Wayland:

It’s a giant database and most of the process got designed by consultants like ourselves, and live outside the system, and are powered sometimes by third-party solutions or organizational knowledge.

Keith Wayland:

Another big thing that we find is that we’re at the tail end of a major ERP cycle that was powered by Y2K. So not all of you, but a lot of you probably implemented in the late ’90s or early 2000s, so about 20 years ago. Which is, by the way, consid